OSCE - Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights

OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR)

The OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) provides support, assistance and expertise to participating States and civil society to promote democracy, rule of law, human rights and tolerance and non-discrimination. ODIHR observes elections, reviews legislation and advises governments on how to develop and sustain democratic institutions. The Office conducts training programmes for government and law-enforcement officials and non-governmental organizations on how to uphold, promote and monitor human rights.

ODIHR – who they are

The OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) is one of the world’s principal regional human rights bodies. Based in Warsaw, Poland, ODIHR is active throughout Europe, the Caucasus, Central Asia and North America. The Office promotes democratic elections, respect for human rights, tolerance and non-discrimination, and the rule of law. Established in 1991, ODIHR employs nearly 150 staff from 30 countries. The Office’s activities are funded through a core budget, which is approved annually by participating States, as well as through voluntary contributions.

ODIHR’s mandate

ODIHR is tasked with assisting OSCE participating States to ensure full respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms; to abide by the rule of law; to promote principles of democracy; to build, strengthen and protect democratic institutions; and to promote tolerance throughout their societies. The Office also plays an important role in enhancing dialogue among States, governments and civil society. It organizes the yearly OSCE Human Dimension Implementation Meeting, three supplementary meetings and a seminar, which review governments’ progress and give NGOs a platform to freely voice their concerns.

What is the human dimension?

The OSCE was created as a security organization, but with a broad concept of security, beyond traditional military security, disarmament and border issues. The OSCE concept of security deals equally with human rights and democracy issues. All OSCE participating States have agreed that lasting security cannot be achieved without respect for human rights and functioning democratic institutions. They have committed themselves to a comprehensive catalogue of human rights and democracy norms. These form the basis of what the OSCE calls the “human dimension” of security.

Why work for OSCE?

Be a positive force for change

There are many reasons to work for OSCE, but the most important is because what they do matters. Nothing beats the individual sense of accomplishment in knowing you are making a difference to the world. And it is not just colleagues on the front line– the Organization is filled with “behind the scenes” people, whose administrative and managerial work is essential to making sure to deliver on OSCE’s mission.

A wide range of opportunities

The work covers many spheres, from political and military, economic and environmental to human rights; offering both work for specialists in those areas and the very important tasks of administrative, finance, human resources and information technology that allows them to work efficiently and effectively day by day.

Please not that you need to be a national of one of the 57 OSCE participating states, to be eligible to apply to join OSCE.

Find more information about how to apply here

 

Here you will find a useful FAQ about employment at OSCE

Vacancies