Amnesty International

Amnesty International is a non-governmental organisation focused on human rights with over 7 million members and supporters around the world. The stated objective of the organisation is "to conduct research and generate action to prevent and end grave abuses of human rights, and to demand justice for those whose rights have been violated."

Amnesty International was founded in London in 1961, following the publication of the article "The Forgotten Prisoners" in The Observer 28 May 1961, by the lawyer Peter Benenson. Amnesty draws attention to human rights abuses and campaigns for compliance with international laws and standards. It works to mobilise public opinion to put pressure on governments that let abuse take place. The organisation was awarded the 1977 Nobel Peace Prize for its "campaign against torture," and the United Nations Prize in the Field of Human Rights in 1978.

In the field of international human rights organisations, Amnesty has the longest history and broadest name recognition, and is believed by many to set standards for the movement as a whole.

Career at Amnesty

If you are talented, passionate about human rights and want to use your skills and experience to change the world then Amnesty might just have the right role for you.

“You won’t just be working for us, you will be working for them”

Joining Amnesty and you will have the opportunity to use your expertise to support this global movement to end human rights abuses.

Amnesty International is a democratic worldwide movement of people who campaign for internationally recognized human rights to be respected and protected for everyone. Amnesty believes human rights abuses anywhere are the concern of people everywhere.

“So, outraged by human rights abuses but inspired by hope for a better world, we work to improve people’s lives through campaigning and international solidarity. Work with us to be a part of this future.”

When you get a job at Amnesty International, you’re working for people whose human rights are under attack.